Looking Forward and Back

With the New Year upon us, many people look to make resolutions to improve themselves in the New Year with the hopes that they will be better for it. I’ve done it and have been disappointed each time.

This never works.

Resolutions only leave me frustrated because it implies that I wasn’t good enough last year–that nothing is ever good enough. What does work is knowing that there is no finish line, no end in sight. Sometimes I’ll get lost on the course and start a century ride over again (did that before realizing what I did and called for my personal SAG vehicle, thanks, Phil!), other times, I’ll come out with a shiny new PR and reach that 5K finish line in record time, and sometimes, my daily workout sucks ass on the treadmill with a side stitch because I ate too much garlic bread. Through all of it, I am consistent, accountable to my training plan, and am flexible as needed.

Consistency is key.

Consistency is also boring. I go to bed and get up at roughly the same time, I have meet ups for some workouts, virtually or socially distant now, for accountability (it’s hard to sleep in when someone is hopping on their bike trainer at 6am waiting for you to ride, but a virtual breakfast after the ride with coffee is the best!), and I pretty much eat the same stuff throughout the week. Boring. Not the “get off my lawn” old person kind of boring, well, sometimes I’m like that. Damn kids.

Accountability goes along with being consistent. Who are you accountable to? Your running, riding, or swim buddies? Do you have a coach? Do you have a friend who expects you to run fast once a week with her so you work hard all week just to keep up? Do you have a training plan or schedule? Adapt your plan day to day, but be consistent with your workouts. If you’re accountable, you’re also consistent.

Lastly, be flexible, but not to the point where accountability and consistency are forgotten. Move your workouts around based on your schedule, but make sure that you get most of them completed with the proper training intensities. Grab a coffee on the go, but maybe not a mocha. Keep your priorities in mind, but have some indulgences every once in awhile. Be kind to yourself. This has been an interesting year, and the next one will be too. Happy New Year!

3,000 in 2020

There is still snow on the ground from last Wednesday’s storm, masters swimming is on hold through the New Year, and I’m currently going to PT for my elbow injury that decided to flare up in September, although my recovery will have to wait a little longer with my next appointment canceled.

I found out I was exposed to COVID-19 last Monday, but wasn’t informed until yesterday. I quickly made an appointment with my doctor for a test, and even though it’s unlikely that I contracted the virus, I’m taking precautions and staying home like my doctor recommended through the next seven days, even though I have no symptoms, and I will know my test results on Thursday, just in time for Christmas.

Until then, I’m staying home and doing my best to keep others safe. I have been wearing a mask, social distancing, and only going to work or running errands as necessary when this exposure happened, but nothing is 100% fool-proof.

So, since I can’t leave the house, I decided to take on a new challenge: ride 3,000 miles on my bike for 2020. I’m less than 200 miles away from this goal and will be riding virtually on Zwift to reach it. In addition, I’m checking to see which courses I haven’t completed to earn those badges too.

When I’m finished riding, I’ll have extra time to bake and give these kitties some much needed attention. Stay safe, stay home, wear a mask, and wash your hands.

Before the Snow Run

Even though it was in the mid 20s this morning, I headed out for a run before the snow. It was cold and windy, but clear. Venus shined brightly and icy patches near the curb were easily spotted. Like the holiday lights on our route, conversation made the run go by quickly and seem less cold. My puffy hat helped too.

The clouds rolled in around mid-morning and sifted sugar on the sidewalks and garden by early afternoon. I made some hot chocolate to go with the powdered doughnut outside so I could watch it turn from sugar to a thick icing, whipped by wind. I really don’t like snow, but I want some doughnuts now.

In two hours, over 2 inches have fallen and counting…

The Ride

The knobby tires rolled over tree roots like a fat thumb over the whites of the piano keys. If I could see my knuckles under the two glove layers, they would be white and bloodless with the way I was gripping the Top Fuel as I bounced down the single-track at what I thought were breakneck speeds. Suddenly, the trail went straight up, and I squeezed the brakes when I should have shifted to a bigger ring while picking up my cadence. Instead, I balanced on the bike with the pedals at 3 and 9 o’clock for a split second before tipping to the side.

I put my foot down and breathed. My legs were shaking uncontrollably.

Colleen was at the top of the hill, having rolled over those roots effortlessly, using her bike like some nimble monster truck crushing cars like soda cans. I walked the rest of the way until the trail leveled off, and I could get my foot back on the pedal to start once again. I knew then if I hesitated, I was finished.

So for the rest of the ride, I tried to make a quick decision and stick to it when descending or climbing this trail I could barely walk on, let alone ride a bike over all of those rock gardens and long sections of tree roots strung across the trail like garland. If I took too much time to think, I failed. I had to trust the line I chose and follow it through.

For a few fleeting moments on the ride, the trail flowed below the bike like water as I stood up with level pedals and weight slightly forward. But then, there was no trail, just a stream six feet down, and I thought I was going to die and be buried right then and there because I was too scared to cross the narrow frosty bridge to the other side where a sharp uphill topped with a rock garden greeted me. I didn’t die. I just fell off my bike a few times. Thankfully, the ground was soft and met me half way.

Once I get another bike, I’ll return to the trails because I might just be part daredevil.

And now this…

I think I have found a fourth sport I like: mountain biking. With my masters’ team on hold for the time being, I snagged this fun demo bike from my shop and plan to hit the trails on Monday. So far, I rode it around the neighborhood, over a few curbs, and up and down the alley behind my house to test out the full suspension frame of this Trek Top Fuel. Yes, it has SPDs, and yes, I clipped in. If I really get into this sport, I’ll use flat pedals to work on my skills that I’m clearly lacking.

As soon as I heard the click of my cleats, I was off and flew down the alley. I soon felt like a little kid tooling around the neighborhood as I rode past other moms at the playground while bouncing up and down over obstacles I would usually avoid on my roadie.

So, I know the fourth and fifth sports of triathlon are transition and nutrition, but I think this triathlete can certainly benefit from the strength of mountain biking. Wish me luck on Monday! Yikes!